C - upcasting and downcasting

0 votes

As an example:

Shouldn't the second d.print() call during upcasting print "base"?

Isn't it a "d" derived object that has been upcasted to a base class object?

And what advantages does downcasting have?

Could you describe upcast and downcast in more detail?

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

class Base {
public:
    void print() { cout << "base" << endl; }
};

class Derived :public Base{
public:
    void print() { cout << "derived" << endl; }

};

void main()
{
    // Upcasting
    Base *pBase;
    Derived d;
    d.print();
    pBase = &d;
    d.print();

    // Downcasting
    Derived *pDerived;
    Base *b;
    pDerived = (Derived*)b;
}
Jul 26 in C++ by Nicholas
• 5,020 points
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