Difference between function overloading and method overloading

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Hello, I'm attempting to figure out the distinction between function overloading and method overloading in C++.

I discovered this while searching.

I'm not convinced this is right.

If something is incorrect, please assist in correcting it.

Method overloading and function overloading are related concepts. The term method overloading is defined as a feature which is found in various programming languages such as C++ and Java. It permits the creation of various functions with the same name. However all these functions differ from each other in terms of the type of input and the type of output of the function.

On the other hand, the term function overloading is used in object-oriented programming. It is defined as a technique in which two or more functions which have the same name are distinguished from one another using different numbers and/or types of parameters.
Jun 21 in C++ by Nicholas
• 4,820 points
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1 answer to this question.

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They are interchangeable.

Some people, on the other hand, prefer calling methods, functions that are part of a class, and functions, free functions.

//function overloading
void foo(int x);
void foo(int x, int y);

//method overloading
class A
{
   void foo(int x);
   void foo(int x, int y);
};

A method or function is overloaded by changing its signature while preserving its name. 

The signature consists of the following:

parameter types names

cv-qualifiers

To overload, just alter the parameters or the CV-qualifiers. 

For example, if the method is part of a class, you may override it like follows:

class A
{
   void foo(int x);
   void foo(int x) const;
   void foo(int x, int y);
};

When working with an immutable object, the prototype foo(int x) const will be invoked.

answered Jun 21 by Damon
• 4,960 points

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