What is the point of function pointers

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The purpose of function pointers is difficult for me to understand.

I suppose that would be helpful in certain situations—they do exist, after all—but I can't think of any circumstances in which using a function pointer is preferable or inevitable.

Could you provide some C or C++ examples of effective function pointer use?
Aug 17 in C++ by Nicholas
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