What are the new features in C 17

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C++17 is currently feature complete, therefore major modifications are unlikely.

Hundreds of ideas for C++17 were submitted.

Which of these features was added to C++17?

Which of those features will be available when the compiler updates to C++17 while using a C++ compiler that supports "C++1z"?
Jul 26 in C++ by Nicholas
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