What does the C standard state the size of int long type to be

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I'm seeking for specific information on the sizes of basic C++ types. 

I understand that it is determined by the architecture (16 bits, 32 bits, or 64 bits) and the compiler.

But are there any C++ standards?

On a 32-bit architecture, I'm using Visual Studio 2008. 

This is what I get:

char  : 1 byte
short : 2 bytes
int   : 4 bytes
long  : 4 bytes
float : 4 bytes
double: 8 bytes

I looked for solid information on the sizes of char, short, int, long, double, float (and additional kinds I didn't think of) under different architectures and compilers, but had little luck.

Jul 7 in C++ by Nicholas
• 5,020 points
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