static memory allocation like dynamic memory allocation

0 votes
int r, c;
cin >> r >> c;
int matrix[r][c];

I don't understand the concept of runtime allocation. 

The goal is to allocate memory during runtime, but we are doing the same thing in the above section of code.

When this section of code is executed, the input sizes are given at runtime, and the matrix is allocated memory based on the size of the rows and columns, so is it static or compile time allocation?

Jun 2, 2022 in C++ by Nicholas
• 7,760 points
167 views

1 answer to this question.

0 votes

This declaration

int r, c;
cin >> r >> c;
int matrix[r][c];

is a variable-length array declaration.

This array has a storage duration that is set automatically. 

And when the values of the variables r and c are known, the array is created at run-time.

Variable length arrays, on the other hand, are not a standard C++ feature.

You could use the standard container std::vector instead of the array.

All elements of the matrix will be zero-initialized if you use std::vector> matrix(r, std::vector(c)).

answered Jun 7, 2022 by Damon
• 4,960 points

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