C this pointer

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What distinguishes this pointer from others?

Pointers, as far as I understand, point to heap memory.

Does this imply that objects are always constructed in heap if a pointer to them exists?

Is it possible to steal this pointer in the move function Object() { [native code] } or move assignment?
May 28 in C++ by Nicholas
• 5,020 points
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1 answer to this question.

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Pointer variables are used to store the address of variable.

Syntax

Type *pointer;

Initialization

Type *pointer;
Pointer=variable name;

The following are the main distinctions between pointers and reference parameters:

Pointers are used to hold the address of a variable, whereas references are used to refer to an existing variable by another name.

A null value cannot be assigned to a reference, although a pointer can.

Pass by value can be used to refer to a reference variable, whereas pass by reference can be used to refer to a pointer.

A reference must be initialized at the time of declaration, but a pointer does not.

A reference has the same memory location as the original variable, but it also occupies some stack space, whereas a pointer has its own memory address and stack size.

answered May 31 by Damon
• 4,960 points

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