Why was the ampersand chosen as the symbol for references in C

0 votes
Does anyone know why the ampersand was selected to represent references in C++?

Stroustroup didn't explain that choice, AFAIK (though I don't have the book nearby), which I find unusual given that the identical sign was previously used for address-of in C.
Aug 16 in C++ by Nicholas
• 6,240 points
17 views

No answer to this question. Be the first to respond.

Your answer

Your name to display (optional):
Privacy: Your email address will only be used for sending these notifications.

Related Questions In C++

0 votes
0 answers

Difference between for loop and the range based loop in C++

The distinction between a for loop and ...READ MORE

Jul 11 in C++ by Nicholas
• 6,240 points
29 views
0 votes
0 answers

Why is the size of an empty class in C++ not zero?

Why does the following output 1? #include <iostream> class Test { }; int ...READ MORE

Aug 17 in C++ by Nicholas
• 6,240 points
21 views
0 votes
1 answer

Why does C++ need the scope resolution operator?

No. There is no scope resolution operator ...READ MORE

answered Jun 1 in C++ by Damon
• 4,960 points
56 views
0 votes
1 answer

The new syntax "= default" in C++11

A defaulted default function Object() { [native code] } is defined as a user-defined default function Object() { [native code] } with an empty compound statement and no initialization list. I'll give you an example to demonstrate the difference: #include <iostream> using namespace std; class A { public: ...READ MORE

answered Jun 7 in C++ by Damon
• 4,960 points
28 views
0 votes
1 answer

Are virtual functions the only way to achieve Runtime Polymorphism in C++?

fprintf is a polymorphism function in the C programming language. It can print to a file, stdout, a printer, a socket, or whatever else the system can represent as a stream if you supply it different handles. FILE* file = fopen("output.txt", "w"); ...READ MORE

answered Jun 21 in C++ by Damon
• 4,960 points
42 views
0 votes
1 answer

What is the best way to use a HashMap in C++?

The ordered and unordered map containers (std::map and std::unordered map) are included in the standard library.  The items in an ordered map are sorted by key, and insert and access are in O (log n).  For ordered maps, the standard library often use red black trees.  However, this is only an implementation detail.  Insert and access are in O in an unordered map (1).  It is simply another term for a hashtable. An illustration using (ordered) std::map: #include <map> #include <iostream> #include <cassert> int main(int argc, char ...READ MORE

answered Jun 10 in C++ by Damon
• 4,960 points
61 views
0 votes
0 answers

What are the differences between a pointer variable and a reference variable?

What distinguishes a reference variable from a ...READ MORE

Jul 11 in C++ by Nicholas
• 6,240 points
31 views
0 votes
1 answer

Why should I use reference variables at all?

References themselves are unrelated to the issue. The issue is because C++ manages object lifetimes differently from run-time systems that employ garbage collectors, such as Java.  There is no standard built-in garbage collector in C++.  Both automatic (within local or global scope) and manual (explicitly allocated/deallocated in heap) object lifetimes are possible in  C++. A C++ reference is nothing more than an object's alias.  It has no knowledge of object lifespan (for the sake of efficiency).  The coder must give it some thought.  A reference bound to a temporary object is an exception; in this situation, the temporary object's lifespan is prolonged to include the lifetime of the bound reference. References play a crucial role in the fundamental ideas of C++, and they are required for 90% of jobs.  Otherwise, pointers must be used, which is typically far worse. You can use references, for instance, when you need to give an object as a function parameter by reference rather than by value: void f(A copyOfObj); ...READ MORE

answered Aug 5 in C++ by Damon
• 4,960 points
32 views
0 votes
1 answer

setuptools: build shared libary from C++ code, then build Cython wrapper linked to shared libary

There is a seemingly undocumented feature of setup that ...READ MORE

answered Sep 11, 2018 in Python by Priyaj
• 58,080 points
217 views
0 votes
1 answer

setuptools: build shared libary from C++ code, then build Cython wrapper linked to shared libary

There is a seemingly undocumented feature of setup that ...READ MORE

answered Sep 21, 2018 in Python by Priyaj
• 58,080 points
1,452 views
webinar REGISTER FOR FREE WEBINAR X
Send OTP
REGISTER NOW
webinar_success Thank you for registering Join Edureka Meetup community for 100+ Free Webinars each month JOIN MEETUP GROUP