Default inheritance access specifier

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If I have two classes A and B, for example, class B inherits A as follows:

class B: public A

In this instance, I'm dealing with public inheritance..

If I write the preceding code like this:

class B: A

What kind of inheritance will I be performing here (public or private)?

To put it another way, what is the default access specifier?

Just a quick inquiry.

Do I refer to the preceding line of code as a statement?

Especially since I recall reading in the book C++ Without Fear: A Beginner's Guide That Makes You Feel Smart that statements that conclude with ; are valid.

What are your thoughts about that?

Thanks.
Jul 22 in C++ by Nicholas
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