Why doesn t C have a garbage collector

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First and foremost, I'm not raising this issue because I believe garbage collection is beneficial.

My major reason for asking is because Bjarne Stroustrup has said that C++ would include a garbage collector at some point.

That being stated, why hasn't it been added?

Garbage collectors for C++ are already available.

Is this one of those "easier said than done" situations?

Or is there another reason it hasn't been introduced (and won't be in C++11)?

To be clear, I understand why C++ didn't include a trash collector when it was initially designed.

I'm curious why the collector isn't included.
Jul 5 in C++ by Nicholas
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